RSS Feed

Monthly Archives: December 2014

Nose In A Book- December 2014

The less time I waste on line, the more books I read. Gee whiz–how surprising! My selections have been eclectic, and I’ve been quite happy with my nose in a book. Here’s is the run down:

1. Up Jumps the Devil by Michael Poore

The devil is alive and well and moves forward and backward in history throughout this book. I’m totally engaged and can’t wait to see what happens next. The main character is, indeed, the devil dba Johnny Scratch, who is smart, compassionate and much nicer than I remember him from Catholic school. This devil is more than just an anonymous evil force, he’s a character. He has sassy conversations with God and criticizes God’s choices. He falls in love and gets dumped. He gets frustrated with stupidity. And he has a code that governs his super powers. The author’s imagination allows the devil to mingle with Ben Franklin, Pocahontas, all kinds of soulful musicians as well as being fully present in contemporary society. Poore is masterful with his creativity as well as his craftsmanship as a writer. My husband and I are reading this book chapter by chapter simultaneously, and we both find the point of view to be captivating and thought provoking. It’s a red hot winner (that was awful, sorry… mortal sin!)

2. Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-Being, Wisdom, and Wonder by Ariana Huffington

The publisher sent me a copy of this book to review, and I confess, I did approach this title with some negative attitude. First of all, how many books do I or anyone else need to read about achieving success without destroying your life? Secondly, why do celebrity writers think they have so much wisdom to share? Well… I was wrong. This book does have useful information, especially the chapters about self-care in the midst of chaos. Huffington takes a careful look at the price we pay for success and questions whether, indeed or not, it is success when one loses oneself in the process. She encourages meditation, yoga, getting ample sleep, and paying attention to one’s own inner barometer. Her writing includes references to serious medical research and is well documented. She also incorporates the ideas of the Greek and Roman masters and other Great Thinkers from around the world in her writing. It was an interesting read. The sections that bored me were easily skimmed, and I was quickly re-engaged and underlining my book. I made many connections to my yoga and meditation practice, and her chapters on unplugging and charitable giving confirmed what I already knew but appreciated the validation. It’s the type of book that after you read once, you keep it nearby and revisit it when needed. It is also perfect for gift giving.

3. Your Fathers, Where Are They And The Prophets Do They Live Forever by Dave Eggers

I can never remember this title and call it “Eggers’ Fathers and Prophets”. Eggers addicts know exactly what I mean. What I love and respect about this book is that it always keeps me off kilter and questioning everything. It makes me think, like problem solving, but better. The characters are weird, the plot is bizarre and yet, I couldn’t put this book down. Eggers ruffles feathers and the whole bird. This work reminds me of early Chuck Palahniuk’s writing, minus the body fluid excesses. Eggers chronicles the life of a man who is questioning the values of contemporary American society. He tries desperately to make meaning and find justice. At first we think he’s just another deranged character stuck in ennui, and then we start to root for him. Not everyone will drawn to this novel, but I found it exhausting and exhilarating at the same time. Some Eggers books I like, some I don’t. This one was worth the work to make it from cover to cover.

4. The Story of Rose: A Man and His Dog by Jon Katz

I love a good story about animals and spent some time earlier this year reading Thornton Burgess, Beatrix Potter, as well as  modern day Tom Ryan’s Following Atticus. I’m always curious to see how writers present the animals, make them come alive on the page and, hopefully, not just sound like humans covered in fur. That’s why I appreciated Katz’s The Story of Rose. Rose is a hard working farm dog, and the story is told from her point of view. The reader sees what she sees through her eyes. She has her struggles, and we are right beside her observing the world through her senses, feeling the struggles, and appreciating the determination she has every day from morning through night. It a very good read. I would have loved to read it aloud to my kids when they were little. It is a joy to read as an adult.

5.  Zoobiquity: The Astonishing Connection Between Human and Animal Health  by Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and Kathryn Bowers

This is one of the most thought provoking books I’ve read in years. The authors successfully show the value in analyzing health issues as they affect both humans and animals. Crossing species lines and sharing information reveals all kinds of connections and possibilities that would not be noticed if one only focused on an individual species. The writing is superb: both well researched and written so well that I enjoyed the language as well as the content. This is another book that I bought five copies of to give as gifts. I kept finding interesting sentences that I read aloud to my husband… that led to entire paragraphs and pages… and finally I got him his own copy of the book.

I’m collecting books to read in 2015.  It’s like making a list and checking it twice, only to ignore the list and enjoy the thrill of a serendipitously enticing book. I will keep you posted and hope you find yourself lost in many delicious books this New Year.